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Day 1 : Aug-18-2014
Keynote Forum

Eduard Rogatsky

Yeshiva University, USA

Keynote: LC-UHPLC hybrid 2D platform for biological samples LC/MS analysis: A new paradigm
Biography:
Eduard Rogatsky completed his MSc in physical chemistry from Belarus State University, PhD in Bioanalytical chemistry from Bar-Ilan University (Israel) in 1999, and postdoctoral studies at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY. He joined the faculty there in 2001, and is currently a Senior Associate Scientist and Director of Mass Spectrometry in the Biomarker Analytical Resource Core Laboratory, Einstein-Montefiore Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Bronx, NY, USA.
Abstract:
Modern UHPLC systems have important advantages over previous generation HPLC systems. These are: a) higher pressure limits, and b) considerably smaller delay and post column volumes, which are essential for the development of fast gradient applications. Fast gradient applications by UHPLC/UV systems are easily adopted in QC/QA applications. Analysis of complex samples was found to be more complicated and costly, if a UHPLC system was used. Clinical sample analysis usually utilizes a large volume injection of a diluted sample, which is suboptimal for a UHPLC autosampler. Extracted samples obtained after sample preparation steps, drying and reconstitution may have small particulates that shorten UHPLC column lifetimes. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nWe developed a cost-efficient hybrid LC platform that’s very efficient for biological sample analysis by LC/MS. This platform is based on Agilent 1100 and Agilent 1290 series LC devises. The sample was injected by a standard (not UHPLC) autosampler into pre-analytical column, where it was desalted and partially purified. A standard pressure range binary HPLC pump was used. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nThe fraction containing analytes of interest was transferred through a UHPLC valve to a fused core column. A fast gradient was performed by using a UHPLC 1290 pump. The addition of a UHPLC valve and pump to a standard 1100 series LC system (autosampler, pump and column compartment) greatly extends operational flexibility including column selection, while standard LC – which is already available in the lab, performs the initial steps of sample loading and clean-up.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nThis platform for LC/MS analysis was successfully used. Instead of retiring an entire functioning Agilent 1100 LC system, it was added just one UHPLC pump to achieve much greater overall performance, functionality and lower cost, compared to a single pump UHPLC system purchase.






Keynote Forum

Yuri A. Zolotov

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia

Keynote: Some trends in analytical chemistry development
Biography:
Dr. Yury A Zolotov has received his Candidate of Sci. and Dr. of Sci. degrees from Vernadskii Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry. He was elected as a full member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and President of Mendeleev Russian Chemical Society. Professor Zolotov has published more than 600 papers and about 30 monographs in analytical chemistry and liquid-liquid extraction. He has received many national and international awards and has been invited to give plenary and keynote lectures at many scientific conferences. Dr. Zolotov is a head of analytical chemistry department of Moscow University.
Abstract:
Twelve trends in analytical chemistry are considered, mostly general ones: movement towards out-of-laboratory, speciation, non-destructive analysis, automatization and miniaturization, pattern recognition, moving towards more active application of achievements of physics or biochemistry. Directions of the changes in analytical techniques, e.g. their hybridization, are also discussed. There are changes even in analytical community and approaches to education.






Keynote Forum

Andrew C Benniston

Newcastle University, UK

Keynote: Towards highly fluorescent dyes and their applications
Biography:
Andrew C Benniston completed his PhD from Warwick University in 1990 and Postdoctoral studies at the Universite Louis Pasteur (Strasbourg) and the University of Texas at Austin. He is Professor of Photonic Energy Sciences at Newcastle University. He has published more than 130 papers in major journals and is currently the Editor for the Journal of Analytical & Bioanalytical Techniques.
Abstract:
Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools used in diagnostics (e.g., ion sensing), because of its extreme sensitivity, low concentration of dye required, and ease in accumulating a good signal-to-noise. A rather pertinent example is in the medical field where fluorophores are routinely used in cell imaging, analyte recognition and the detection of radicals. However, autofluorescence (i.e., background noise from other chromophores) can be problem, especially if there is considerable overlap of fluorescence signals from multiple chromophores. A number of solutions to the problem have been developed covering, for example, the use of time-gated spectroscopy and lanthanide millisecond emitters, delayed fluorescence, employment of long-wavelength absorbing/near I.R. emitters and large Stokes’ shift dyes. Certainly this latter solution is promising if a suitable dye can be identified where the structures of the emissive and ground state are very different. In a quest to identify and produce new highly fluorescent materials we have explored several different derivatives.






Keynote Forum

Sergei Shtykov

Saratov State University, Russia

Keynote: Nanoanalytics – a reply of analytical chemistry to the era of nanotechnology
Biography:
Sergei Shtykov has completed his PhD from Saratov State University (SSU) in 1980 and Doctorate dissertation (Habilitation) from the SSU in 1990. From 1993 he is a Full Professor on the chair of Analytical Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of SSU. From 2005 he is a member of Division of Analytical Chemistry of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (DAC EuCheMS). He has published more than 250 papers in academic journals and was Supervisor of 20 PhD and 8 Doctorate dissertations. His scientific direction is an application of nanoobjects, nanotechnologies and supramolecular principles in the chemical analysis.
Abstract:
Nanotechnology is the most popular and fastest growing area in science now. Analytical chemistry being a highly interdisciplinary in its nature cannot set aside an attractive power and advances of the nanotechnology. As a result the term “nanoanalytics” was appeared now but currently it has different meanings due to no agreement in analytical society about the matter. Careful examination of publications allows propose the following definition of nanoanalytics. “Nanoanalytics is a part of analytical chemistry developing the principles and methods of application the nanotechnologies, and unusual properties of nanosized objects in the chemical analysis”. According this definition we can identify and understand what the problems are and how to solve them when consider a concept, elements and peculiarities of nanoanalytics. It cannot be doubted that nanoanalytics deals with different nanotechnologies that in turn can be subdivided into two groups. First one includes measuring physical technologies that are applied to characterization of the nanoobjects sizes, morphology and chemical composition. The second group includes chemical synthetic technologies for development of new nanoobjects to get new analytical possibilities. Nanoobjects serve as tools in the chemical analysis and can be also subdivided into two groups: solid and liquid objects that are different from thermodynamic point if view. Some detailed information concerning this concept and application of nanotechnologies, solid and liquid nanoobjects as well as chemical analysis of nanoobjects themselves will be presented and discussed. The work was supported by RFBR, project no. 12-03-00450a.
11:15-11:30 Coffee Break @ Foyer






Keynote Forum

Graham Lawson

De Montfort University, UK

Keynote: Counterfeit tablet investigations: Is ATR FT/IR a technique for the real world?
Biography:
Graham Lawson is a Principal Lecturer in Forensic Analysis in the Leicester School of Pharmacy at De Montfort University. His expertise and research interests lie in the application of various instrumental analytical techniques to the identification and quantification of toxic and other species in a variety of matrices: blood, water, food etc. This has led to the development of micro-analytical methodologies based on LC-MS and LC-HRMS studies (awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry Analytical Methods Prize in 2010) complimented by new ATR FT/IR spectroscopic investigations.
Abstract:
Counterfeit medicines are introduced as a worldwide problem but with regional emphasis focused on different disease states. The occurrence of counterfeits ranges from 1-2% in the UK to 30-40% in some African countries. According to the WHO counterfeits medicines may have: no active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) present, the wrong level of API, the wrong API, high levels of contaminants or be in counterfeit packaging. The different analytical approaches to identifying counterfeit medicines are discussed in terms of instrumental complexity and analysis time. The usability of the different systems under real world conditions are discussed and lead to the potential of Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) FT/IR techniques to provide rapid quantitative investigations of suspect tablet formulations. ATR FT/IR methods require only that the tablet be crushed prior to analysis providing a considerable time saving over the solvent extraction protocols used by the British Pharmacopoeia. Standard spectra of API plus excipients, from crushed tablets, were recorded for identification purposes and quantitative data was obtained from spectra of calibrated mixtures of the API and excipients.\\r\\nThe APIs studied include paracetamol, atenolol, aspirin and caffeine with a range of different excipients. Tablet samples from various countries including India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the UK were examined. Initial results showed, the API could be identified down to ca 5% w/w of the tablet. Quantification was linear with selected characteristic peak areas for each API/excipient mixture. The analysis of the tablet samples generally showed good agreement with expectation but there were considerable discrepancies in the levels of API in the atenolol tablets. This was confirmed by conventional extractive analyses. ATR FT/IR can therefore identify counterfeit tablets rapidly without the need for solvents.\\r\\nWhilst LC MS/MS and NMR techniques may be the ‘gold standards’ of the analytical world they are of much reduced value in sub-Saharan African countries whereas a portable ATR FT/IR may prevent the use of counterfeit antimalarial tablets which impact on patient health and contribute to the increase in drug resistant species.






Keynote Forum

Huangxian Ju

Nanjing University, P. R. China

Keynote: Signal amplification for bioanalysis
Biography:
Huangxian Ju received BS, MS and PhD from Nanjing University during 1982-1992 and was a postdoc in Montreal University from 1996-1997. He became an associate and full professor of Nanjing University in 1993 and 1999. He won the National Funds for National Distinguished Young Scholars in 2003 and National Creative Research Groups in 2006. He was selected as a Changjiang Professor in 2007, a Chief Scientist of National Basic Research Program of China in 2009 and the Director of State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science in 2011. His research interests focus on analytical biochemistry and molecular diagnosis. He has published 457 papers with an h-index of 60 and SCI citation of 12175, authored 27 patents, 2 English books, 6 Chinese books, and 6 Chinese and 8 English chapters.
Abstract:
To detect biomolecules with low abundance and extract the ultra weak biological signals, our group brings nanotechnology and biotechnology into the development of analytical methodologies, and has designed a series of novel signal amplification strategies for sensitive detection of biomolecules. Nanotechnologies for signal amplification include 6 ways: 1) accelerating the electron transfer or obtaining sensitized optical signal, 2) realizing optical, electrical or visual analysis by applying the catalytic and enzyme mimetic functions of the nanomaterials, 3) using nanomaterials as tag molecules, 4) using nanomaterials as the carriers of signaling molecules, 5) using nanomaterials to realize electrochemiluminescent or photoelectrochemical signal amplification, and 6) selectively concentration of biomolecules using biofunctionalized nanomaterials. The molecular biological technologies for signal amplification are to use PCR, rolling circle amplification, target-induced repeated primer extension, hybridization chain reaction, loop-mediated amplification and target DNA recycling amplification including endonuclease-, exonuclease- and polymerase-based circular strand-replacement polymerization to amplify the electrochemical, optical and visual signals. These novel signal amplification strategies have been used for electrochemical detections, optical detections such as chemiluminescent analysis, fluorescent analysis and infrared, ultraviolet and Raman analysis; mass spectrometric analysis and the development of imaging technologies such as grayscale scanning imaging, scanning electrochemical microscopy imaging, chemiluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging, Raman spectral imaging and mass spectral imaging. The established methods can conveniently be used in the detections of small biomolecules, DNA, proteins, cells, the carbohydrate sites on cell surfaces intracellular microRNA as well as pre-microRNA, intracellular telomerase and sialyltransferase activity. Some methods can even realize quasi-single-molecule detection.






Track 1: Novel Approaches to Analytical and Bioanalytical Methods
Track 2: Analytical Methodology
Session Chair

Doo Soo Chung

Seoul National University, Korea




Session Co-Chair

L. A. Frank

Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia




Session Introduction

Marina M. Vdovenko

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia

Title: Chemiluminescent determination of Hydrogen Peroxide using FeIII-TAML activator, a Potent peroxidase mimicking enzyme
Biography:
Marina M. Vdovenko is a Scientific Researcher at the Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia). She has graduated with PhD degree in Biotechnology in 2011 under Prof. Ivan Yu. Sakharov. Presently her work focuses on the development of novel sensitive chemiluminescent methods for their use in analytical practice. She has published more than 15 papers in peer-reviewed journals.
Abstract:
Efforts to replace native peroxidase with its low molecular weight alternatives have stimulated a search for peroxidase mimetics. Herein we describe the oxidation of luminol with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by commercial available FeIII-TAML activator 1a, which was showed to be more active catalyst than hemin. At FeIII-TAML activator 1a use in chemiluminescent assay for H2O2 determination the limit value (3σ) was 5 x 10-8 M, whereas in the presence of hemin the detection limit was significantly higher and equal to 6 x 10-7 M. The linear ranges (R2 = 0.98) of the assay were 6 x 10-8 – 1 x 10-6 M and 6 x 10-7 – 1 x 10-6 M H2O2 for FeIII-TAML 1a and hemin, respectively. The CV values for FeIII-TAML 1a-based assay measured within the working range varied from 1.0 to 3.7 % (n=4), whereas in the case of hemin – 5.0 to 9.7 % (n=4). Moreover, the sensitivity of FeIII-TAML 1a-based method was 56 times higher than that of hemin-based method. The obtained results open good perspectives to apply FeIII-TAML activator 1a in CL analytical methods instead of hemin, traditionally used peroxidase mimetic.






Seung-Woo Lee

The University of Kitakyushu, Japan

Title: Thin film microextraction of VOCs from biological samples using PDMS/ZSM-5 hybrid adsorbents
Biography:
Seung-Woo Lee obtained his Ph.D. degree in Chemistry and Biochemistry from Kyushu University, Japan, in 1999. He is now a Professor of the Graduate School of Environmental Engineering of the University of Kitakyushu, Japan. His current scientific interests include organic/inorganic nanohybrids, molecular imprinting using metal oxide thin films, and GC-MS analysis and chemical sensing of biological compounds.
Abstract:
Thin film microextraction (TFME) approach recently aroused in the scientific literature as one of the alternative to the solid phase microextraction (SPME) based on the fiber geometry. Generally, in theory, not different from SPME, TFME possesses several important advantages. Since the amount of analytes extracted in SPME is proportional to the volume of the extraction phase, the sensitivity of a method can be improved by increasing the volume of the extraction phase. In general, this extraction approach exhibits much higher extraction rates than SPME fiber due to the higher surface area to extraction phase volume of the thin film. In this technique, scientists used a thin sheet of PDMS membrane attached to a deactivated stainless steel rod like a flag. In current research, we investigated a class of hybrid materials of zeolite and polydimethylsiloxane. Such hybrid materials have been previously reported for several tasks, in particular, selective filtration due to size exclusion mechanism. However, these composites were not thoroughly studied for the chemicals sorption, retention and controlled release purposes. They not only possess longer retention of targeted analytes due to size-fitting on the zeolite pores but also can be used for enhanced preconcentration and selectivity over conventional PDMS as a solid extraction phase. More detailed results will be presented at the conference.






Rodolphe Marie

DTU Nanotech, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark

Title: Mapping single DNA molecules to the human genome in a nanofluidic device
Biography:
Rodolphe Marie has completed his PhD in 2004 from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and postdoctoral studies from Lund University in Sweden. He is an associate Professor at DTU Nanotech, the department of micro and nanotechnology at DTU.
Abstract:
Single DNA molecules of genomic length can be stretched by confinement in nanofluidic channels. Nanofluidic devices have been used to characterize the base pair sequence [1-3], or the methylation [4] of DNA by imaging fluorescence barcodes of single molecules. The resolution of the fluorescence barcode imaged on DNA is maximized when the DNA is stretched to its full contour length (0.34 nm per base pair). In nanochannels, DNA stretching is provided by confinement only i.e. DNA can be fully stretched if the channel cross-section matches the persistence length of the DNA (50 nm), which can be challenging to fabricate. We designed a nanofluidic device where 98% stretching of genomic DNA is achieved by an additional mechanism: the hydrodynamic drag of a buffer flow [5]. At such high stretching, the number of base pairs included in the diffraction limit is minimized thus providing the best barcode resolution obtainable using conventional epifluorescence (about 1 kilobase). We used our device to image fluorescence barcodes of human DNA fragments obtained by proteolysis of metaphase chromosomes. The fluorescence barcodes are specific to the underlying base sequence of each fragment covering a minimum of 1.4 mega base pairs. We have shown that the barcode image enables to map each fragment to its origin in the human reference genome. Moreover, we were able to detect large structural variations (from a couple of kilobase and up) present in single copies of the human genome by comparing the fluorescence pattern of a given molecule to the pattern expected from the human reference genome (hg18).






Shu-Hua Cheng

National Chi Nan University, Taiwan

Title: Electrochemical determination of pyrogallol at conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxothiophene) film-modified screen-printed carbon electrodes
Biography:
Shu-Hua Cheng completed her PhD in chemistry from National Taiwan University in 1994. After teaching in Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science for five years, she moved to Department of Applied Chemistry at National Chi Nan University, and promoted to full professor in 2006. Presently her research works mainly focus on the design of conducting polymers and hybrids, and fabrication of modified electrodes for sensitive and selective determination of small molecules related to health care and environmental monitoring.
Abstract:
The electrochemical oxidation of pyrogallol at electrogenerated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film-modified screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was investigated. The voltammetric peak for the oxidation of pyrogallol in pH 7 buffer solution at the modified electrode occurred at 0.13 V, much lowered than the bare SPCE and preanodized SPCE. All experimental parameters, including the electropolymerization conditions and solution pH values, were optimized to improve voltammetric responses. A linear calibration plot based on flow-injection amperometry was obtained for 1-1000 μM pyrogallol, and a slope of 0.030 μA/M was obtained. The detection limit (S/N=3) was 0.63 μM.






L. A. Frank

Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Title: Coelenterazine-dependent bioluminescent proteins as effective reporters for in vitro assay
Biography:
Dr. Ludmila A. Frank got her Ph.D. degree in Biophysics (1997) and Dr. of Sciences degree in Biology (2010) at the Institute of Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Krasnoyarsk. At present, she is a leading researcher of the Institute and Professor of the Siberian Federal University. Her research interests are concerned with investigating structure and function of light-emitting proteins and development of analytical systems on their base. She is the author and co-author of more than 100 publications and several international and Russian patents.
Abstract:
Nowadays, the light-emitting proteins are the promising analytical tool for both in vitro and in vivo applications to meet the growing demands of science and medicine. The great part of analytical techniques is based on coelenterazine-dependent bioluminescent systems derived from luminous marine organisms. Bioluminescent signal in the organisms arises as a result of coelenterazine (CE) oxidation catalyzed by special enzymes, luciferases. The CE-dependent luciferases of different origin (coelenterates, ctenophores, copepods, ostracods, etc.) known for today are relatively small single-chain proteins having nothing common but a substrate. Luciferases of special type, Ca2+-regulated photoproteins, are stable complexes of apophotoprotein and pre-oxidized substrate molecule – peroxycoelenterazine, which is strongly but non-covalently immobilized in the protein hydrophobic cavity. Bioluminescent reaction is triggered with Ca2+ producing coelenteramide, CO2, and a flash of blue light. Several CE-dependent luciferases are comprehensively studied as to biochemical properties, tertiary structures, bioluminescence mechanism etc. Application of photoproteins and luciferases as reporters in binding assay has many prospects due to the high quantum yield of bioluminescent reaction, providing high-sensitivity detection; assay robustness, reproducibility, and safety. Of special interest is the use of luciferases genetically modified so to obtain novel enzymes with unique properties such as shifted bioluminescence spectra, varied kinetics, thermostability, or the enzymes fused with polypeptide modules (mini antibodies, biotinylated site, etc.) that are responsible for the assay specificity.
Lunch Break 13:10-14:00 @ Easy Kitchen






Doo Soo Chung

Seoul National University, Korea

Title: Liquid extraction surface analysis coupled with capillary electrophoresis to determine organophosphorous pesticides on apple
Biography:
Doo Soo Chung has completed his PhD from Harvard University and postdoctoral studies from MIT and Iowa State University. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals.
Abstract:
A surface-sampling technique called liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) was coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) to determine organophosphorus pesticides, including glufosinate-ammonium, aminomethylphosphonic acid, and glyphosate on the external surface of a fruit such as an apple. A solution containing the pesticides was sprayed onto a solid surface. Without any sample pretreatment, the dried analytes on the surface were directly extracted to a hanging drop of extractant at the inlet tip of a capillary. This extraction was made possible by a liquid microjunction that is formed between the sample surface and the extractant drop. The extraction efficiency was enhanced by repeating steps of dispensing and aspirating the extractant drop. After extraction, the analytes were derivatized in-capillary with a fluorophore 4-flouro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole and analyzed by CE-laser induced fluorescence detection. The limits of detection of the glufosinate-ammonium and glyphosate with LESA-CE were 20-fold lower than the EPA tolerance levels.






Andrew C. Benniston

Newcastle University, UK

Title: Measuring viscosity on the nanoscale using fluorescent molecular rotors
Biography:
Andrew C. Benniston completed his PhD from Warwick University in 1990 and postdoctoral studies at the Universite Louis Pasteur (Strasbourg) and the University of Texas at Austin. He is Professor of Photonic Energy Sciences at Newcastle University. He has published more than 130 papers in major journals and is currently the Editor-In Chief for the Journal of Analytical & Bioanalytical Techniques.
Abstract:
Molecular environment-sensitive probes offer the opportunity to chart physical and structural alterations on the nanoscale. Many areas of science have benefited from the unique information afforded by probes located within inaccessible spaces, which could not be collected by conventional techniques. Response to pH, polarity, temperature, extraneous metal ions, poisons and biomolecules are common place. Luminescence has certainly been one of the most popular methods used for readout purposes, since it is highly sensitive and non-intrusive when employed for biological applications. Temporal profiling is also possible with luminescence, so that timescales (e.g., picoseconds to milliseconds) for molecular events is achievable. There are a wealth of fluorescence reporters to date, some of which are tailor-made for specific purposes such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection, lipid mobility monitoring, protein sequencing and DNA/RNA recognition. Certainly one of the most versatile classes of fluorescent reporters to date is based on the borondipyrromethene (Bodipy) group. Generally, the fully alkylated molecule (BD) is strongly fluorescent in fluid solution at room temperature. It is very noticeable that fluorescence is much lower for certain fully non-alkylated versions (ROT), especially in non-viscous solvents. There is an enhancement (ca. 4 fold) in fluorescence quantum yield as the solvent viscosity increases by around 10 cP. The solvent viscosity effect is traced to reduction in the non-radiative decay process, and the retardation in rotation of the meso aryl group with the increase in solvent viscosity. As the aryl group rotates it distorts slightly the pyrromethene backbone, which in turn affects the rate for non-radiative decay. The one problem with the first prototype of so-called Bodipy molecular rotor was the low starting point fluorescence output. We were especially interested to see if the original signal could be enhanced, with no detrimental effect on the overall fluorescence viscosity response. This talk will discuss our current progress in producing rheological probes (ROFRET) using intramolecular energy transfer to try and enhance the output signal.






Sergei Shtykov

Saratov State University, Russia

Title: Supramolecular and nanobiomimetic approach to optimization of analytical reactions
Biography:
Sergei Shtykov has completed his PhD from Saratov State University (SSU) in 1980 and Doctorate dissertation (Habilitation) from the SSU in 1990. From 1993 he is a Full Professor on the chair of Analytical Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of SSU. From 2005 he is a member of Division of Analytical Chemistry of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (DAC EuCheMS). He has published more than 250 papers in academic journals and was Supervisor of 20 PhD and 8 Doctorate dissertations. His scientific direction is an application of nanoobjects, nanotechnologies and supramolecular principles in the chemical analysis.
Abstract:
The base for this approach is spontaneous and self-assembly formation in the solution of different kinds of liquid nanoreactors (micelles, microemulsions, vesicles, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, LB, L-B-L films) simultaneously with the analytes and analytical reagents i.e. supramolecular effect. As a result of inclusion of the analytes and reagents into the nanoreactors, the guest microenvironment changes and provokes the change of their protolytic, tautomeric, complexing and a reactivity properties, hydration and analytical characteristics. Several features of liquid nanosystems, which are the base for their biomimetic behavior and enhancement of the analytical and metrological characteristics in chemical analysis and separation, are as follows: - the ability to concentrate and bring close together the components of analytical reaction in the nanoreactor pseudophase even though they are considerably different in hydrophobicity; - the multicenter and multifunctional noncovalent interactions of the components of nanophase with solubilized substrate; among these interactions, the hydrophobic ones plays a predominant role; - the pronounced oriented sorption and cavity effect, in which the nature and geometric compatibility of the host and guest are the decisive factors for the binding of a substrate; - the considerable microheterogeneity of the medium within nanopseudophase which manifests itself in dramatic changes in the dielectric constant, micropolarity, microacidity, microviscosity and other physicochemical properties of the unique medium with gradient of these properties. As a result, dramatic enhancements of all kinds of analytical signals in many methods takes place, and new methods are appeared. The work was supported by RFBR, project no. 12-03-00450a.






Yoon-Bo Shim

Pusan National University, S. Korea

Title: Simultaneous determination of phthalate esters in a microfluidic device coupled with an electrochemical sensor
Biography:
Prof. Yoon-Bo Shim has completed his PhD at 1985 from Pusan National University and postdoctoral studies from University of New Mexico (USA). His major is analytical chemistry and electrochemistry. He is a professor of chemistry department and the director of Institute of BioPhysio Sensor Technology at Pusan National University. He has published more than 280 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as editorial board members of Electroanalysis, Sensor, Chemosensor.
Abstract:
An on-chip preconcentration, separation, and electrochemical detection method was developed for the simultaneous determination of endocrine disruptor (ED), phthalate esters using a microfluidic channel device. The electrochemical analysis of phthalate esters in aqueous media is difficult using conventional methods due to the extremely negative potential for the reduction of them. Thus, the sensor probe layer was assembled with dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) and toluidine blue O (TBO) on the conductive polymer layer to capture and reduce the EDs on the probe through the control of the surface charge and hydrophobic properties. Terthiophene benzoic acid was synthesized and electrochemically polymerized, then a DOPE and TBO were chemically bonded together on polyTTBA. The modified sensor probe shows the reduction peak of phthalate esters around -1.6 V in 0.1 M buffer solution (pH 10.0), while the bare electrode doesn’t show any redox peak of them. The sensor probe was firstly examined for the electrochemical detection of five phthalate esters using voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Then, the microfluidic channel coupled with the sensor probe was used for the simultaneous analysis of them. Experimental parameters affecting the analytical performance were assessed and optimized in terms of ratio of DOPE:TBO (v/v%), detection potential, pH, and running buffer concentration. The dynamic linear range and detection limits were 0.15 nM - 1.0 µM and 12.5 ± 1.5 pM with relative standard deviations of <5%. The reliability of the proposed method was evaluated with real environmental samples that show excellent performance for the analysis of a phthalate ester family, one of major EDs.






Sebania Libertino

Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM), Italy

Title: Optical Si-based biosensors: First results
Biography:
Sebania Libertino got her Ph.D. (1998) at the University of Catania. From 1997 she works at the Microelectronic and Microsystems institute (IMM) of the Italian National Council of Research (CNR), since 2007 with the role of Senior researcher. Her research interests are oriented to the design and fabrication of Si-based microelectronic and optoelectronic devices and to biological molecules integration in these devices for sensor applications. She has co-authored 3 chapters of books and more than 100 papers published in international journals. She holds 3 European patents, all extended to USA.
Abstract:
Optical biosensors based on the use of fluorescent dyes are commonly employed in biomedical applications (e.g. DNA microarray). The optical signal is the transduction mechanism used to recognize DNA hybridization between a probe anchored on a surface and the labelled DNA target. Labelling is performed conjugating optical fluorophores to the target DNA molecule and the detection system is based on optial scanners or CCD cameras. Finally, optical images are elaborated in a post-acquisition analysis through complex softwares. Aim of our work was the fabrication and characterization of optical biosensors using traditional and novel fluorescent dyes and a novel sensor. The fluorophores used are the traditional CY5 and a newer organic molecule, the Ru(bpy)32+, while the phtodetectors are a pixel array of solid state photon-detectors (Silicon Photomultipliers, SiPM), produced by STMicroelectronics in Catania. These devices have been also employed to study the dyes emission features (lifetimes and emission spectra). Finally, SiPM were used as photon counters to detect the fluorophore signal of dyes coupled to single-strand (ss) or double-strand (ds) DNA. Pulsed measurements performed on Cy5 emission allowed us to conclude that SiPM can be used as photon counter also for biosensing applications. The use of Ru(bpy)32+, exhibiting a large difference between the excitation and the emission wavelengths, could allow to implement new detection systems, also enabling different detection parameters, such as the fluorophore lifetime.






Yuri A. Zolotov

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia

Title: Some trends in analytical chemistry development
Biography:
Dr. Yury A Zolotov has received his Candidate of Sci. and Dr. of Sci. degrees from Vernadskii Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry. He was elected as a full member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and President of Mendeleev Russian Chemical Society. Professor Zolotov has published more than 600 papers and about 30 monographs in analytical chemistry and liquid-liquid extraction. He has received many national and international awards and has been invited to give plenary and keynote lectures at many scientific conferences. Dr. Zolotov is a head of analytical chemistry department of Moscow University.
Abstract:
Twelve trends in analytical chemistry are considered, mostly general ones: movement towards out-of-laboratory, speciation, non-destructive analysis, automatization and miniaturization, pattern recognition, moving towards more active application of achievements of physics or biochemistry. Directions of the changes in analytical techniques, e.g. their hybridization, are also discussed. There are changes even in analytical community and approaches to education.
Coffee Break 16:00-16:15 @ Foyer






Celina Nazareth

PES’s Rajaram and Tarabai Bandekar College of Pharmacy, India

Title: Development and Validation of HPTLC method for simultaneous estimation of Olmesartan Medoxomil and Indapamide in tablet dosage form
Biography:
Celina Nazareth completed her Masters degree in Pharmacy (Quality Assurance) from Goa University in 1997 and is pursuing her PhD in Pharmaceutical sciences from JNTU Hyderabad. She is currently working as Assistant Professor at PES’s Rajaram and Tarabai Bandekar College of Pharmacy, Farmagudi, Ponda, Goa and has over 14 years teaching experience. She has 4 scientific papers and has presented 4 posters at conferences. Her research interests are instrumental analysis using chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. She teaches Pharmaceutical Analysis at the graduate and post graduate level.
Abstract:
A simple, precise, specific and accurate high performance thin layer chromatographic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of Olmesartan medoxomil and Indapamide in pharmaceutical dosage form. The separation was carried out on Merck HPTLC aluminium plates of silica gel 60F254, using toluene: chloroform: ethanol (4:4:1 v/v) as the mobile phase. HPTLC separation of the two drugs followed by densitometric measurement was carried out in the absorbance mode at 254 nm. The drugs were resolved with Rf values of 0.15 and 0.47 for Olmesartan medoxomil and Indapamide, respectively. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed good linear relationship with r value 0.99930 and 0.99660 for Olmesartan medoxomil and Indapamide respectively, in the concentration range of 100 to 700ng/spot for Olmesartan and 100 to 600ng/spot for Indapamide. The method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to accuracy, precision, specificity and robustness. The limit of detection and quantitation were 100 and 300 ng/spot respectively for Olmesartan and 100 and 300 ng/spot for Indapamide. The proposed developed HPTLC method can be applied for identification and quantitative determination of Olmesartan medoxomil and Indapamide in bulk drugs and pharmaceutical dosage form.






Wen-Hsi Cheng

Fooyin University, Taiwan

Title: Sampling gaseous compounds of heating essential oil using solid phase microextraction devices
Biography:
Wen-Hsi Cheng is a professor at the Department of Occupational Safety and Hygiene, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan.
Abstract:
In our laboratory, we have packed needle trap samplers (NTS) by ourselves for extracting indoor volatile organic compounds. This investigation compared the extraction efficiency of NTS with that of the commercial 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane-solid phase microextration (PDMS-SPME) fiber sampler when applied to sample heating products from tee tree essential oil. The experimental results indicated that NTS performed better effectiveness than those of SPME fiber sampler, and the NTS, packed with 80–100 mesh divinylbenzene (DVB) particles, primarily adsorbed 5.7 ng ethylbenzene, 5.8 ng m/p-xylenes, 11.1 ng 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 12.4 ng 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 9.99 ng 1,4-diethylbenzene when thermal ceramic wicks were used to evaporate the tee tree essential oil during 1-hr evaporation period.






Deia Abd El-Hady

King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

Title: Using of Short Chain alkyl imidazolium ionic liquids in enhancing the sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis
Biography:
Deia Abd El-Hady has completed his PhD from Assiut University, Egypt joined with University of Bologna in Italy. He got postdoctoral grant by DAAD to study at Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. Currently, he is an associate professor in King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed analytical journals.
Abstract:
Recently, ionic liquids (ILs) have gained in popularity as unique solvents in different areas of separation techniques. Owing to tunable properties which can be selected by choosing appropriate cationic or anionic constituents, they can be applied in different separation processes. The current work focuses on the applications of short chain alkyl imidazolium ILs to enhance the sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for compounds measurements in complicated matrices. So far the applications of ILs in different modes of CE is still growing and attracting great attention. It seems to be obvious that new possibilities of ILs applications in CE will also be discovered in future.






Gaolin Liang

University of Science and Technology of China, China

Title: Fluorescence switch for selectively sensing Copper (II) and L-Histidine in vitro and in living cells
Biography:
Gaolin Liang, born 1972, is full professor at University of Science and Technology of China starting from March 2010. He received his B.S. from Nanjing University in 1993, M.S. from Zhengzhou University in 2002, and Ph.D. from Fudan University in 2005. From 2005 to 2008, he was a postdoctoral fellow at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology under the supervision of Professor Bing Xu. From 2008 to 2010, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University under the supervision of professor Jianghong Rao. Prof. Liang’s research interests mainly focus on nanochemistry, molecular and cellular imaging, and biomedical analysis.
Abstract:
Herein, we report the development of a new fluorescence switch for selectively sensing Cu2+ and L-Histidine (L-His) in vitro and in living cells for the first time. In the absence of metal ions, Ac-SAACQ-Gly-Gly-Gly-Lys (FITC) (1) exhibits comparable fluorescence to that of free FITC. In the presence of metal ions, 1 selectively coordinates with Cu2+, causing its fluorescence emission quenched via photoinduced electron transfer. Interestingly, as-formed 1-Cu2+ complex selectively responds to L-His among the 20 natural amino acids by turning its fluorescence on. This property of fluorescence switch of 1 was successfully applied to qualitatively and quantitatively sensing Cu2+ and L-His in vitro. Using this dualfunctional probe, we also sequentially imaged Cu2+ and L-His in living HepG2 cells. Our new probe 1 could be applied for not only environment monitoring or biomolecule detections, but also disease diagnoses in the near future.






Xin Chen

East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China

Title: An in situ liquid cell TEM study on nanomaterial depositions and nano characterizations
Biography:
Xin Chen has completed his Ph.D at the age of 33 years from University of Houston and postdoctoral studies from University of Houston. He served as Visiting Research Assistant Professor in University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and he is now Shanghai Thousand Plan Professor in East China University of Science and Technology. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals, made invited talks in several international conferences, and edited a book. He is a referee of over 15 reputed journals, and he has served as committee member in several reputed research societies and international conferences.
Abstract:
In situ liquid cell TEM technology has been used to study nano material deposition by means of liquid phase electron beam induced deposition (LP-EBID). The electron beam energy varies from 100 keV to 200 keV. Firstly, using a HAuCl4 solution as the precursor and under a broad electron beam, scattered gold nano particles of 14-72 nm have been deposited. Then using SiCl4 and SiCl4 in CH2Cl2 solutions as the precursors and under well focused electron beam irradiations, localized Si and SiCx nano dots and nano wires have been developed. The size and shape of the Si and Six nano structures can be well controlled by adjusting the deposition parameters, and the nanostructures are found to attach well to the Si3N4 window substrates of the liquid cell, showing good promise for future nanoelectronic device developments. Besides these inorganic nanostructures, the in situ TEM technology has been further successfully used to perform nano characterizations on organic composites and biological cells.






Huangxian Ju

Nanjing University, P. R. China

Title: Design of nanoprobes for in situ analysis of cellular functional biomolecules
Biography:
Huangxian Ju received BS, MS and PhD from Nanjing University during 1982-1992 and was a postdoc in Montreal University from 1996-1997. He became an associate and full professor of Nanjing University in 1993 and 1999. He won the National Funds for National Distinguished Young Scholars in 2003 and National Creative Research Groups in 2006. He was selected as a Changjiang Professor in 2007, a Chief Scientist of National Basic Research Program of China in 2009 and the Director of State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science in 2011. His research interests focus on analytical biochemistry and molecular diagnosis. He has published 457 papers with an h-index of 60 and SCI citation of 12175, authored 27 patents, 2 English books, 6 Chinese books, and 6 Chinese and 8 English chapters.
Abstract:
Cellular functional biomolecules, such as glycans, microRNA, telomerase etc., regulate a variety of vital biological events, and thus have been regarded as attractive targets for biomedical research, molecular diagnostics and disease therapy. Due to the lack of noninvasive methods for interrogation of the related biological process, our recent efforts have been devoted to the fabrication of nanoprobes for in situ analysis of various cellular functional biomolecules and highly selective photodynamic therapy (PDT). For cell surface glycan detection, we proposed a novel competitive recognition format and a solution encoding strategy for quantitative analysis of multiple glycans on living cells, and fabricated a disposable electrochemical cytosensor array for simultaneous monitoring of multiple glycans on intact cell surfaces. Focusing on the urgent need for in situ analysis of intracellular telomerase, we designed a mesoporous silica nanoprobe and a nicked molecular beacon by using telomerase-responsive primer DNA to produce “off-on” imaging of intracellular telomerase activity. In order to monitor intracellular miRNA levels, a polyethylenimine-grafted graphene nanoribbon and a multifunctional SnO2 nanoprobe were fabricated for simultaneous specific delivery, cell imaging and intracellular miRNA detection. The SnO2 nanoprobe could also be used for regulating the expression of intracellular miRNA level. To achieve highly selective PDT, we proposed two cell-specific and acidic pH-activatable nanoparticles by introducing selenium into rubyrin core to enhance the 1O2 generation efficiency and dimethylaminophenyl moiety at mesoposition of rubyrin to achieve pH-controllable activity, and using R16FP to generate 1O2 and BDP-688 for therapeutic monitoring, which combined folate and selected aptamer at the surface of nanoparticles to obtain cancer cell targeting feature, respectively. We believe these studies would accelerate the understanding of biological roles of these functional biomolecules and provide valuable tools for in vivo clinical research.
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